Suggested Reading

Do you have a suggestion for some good Foodie Reading material?  It could be something you've never read before, but always wanted to....or it could be a title you are very familiar with.  We can't guarantee that every suggestion will be picked, but it's fantastic to have choices! 

Leave your suggestions for foodie-type books (books that inspire you to head into the kitchen) in the comments section below.

*If possible, please include title, author, and a little bit about why you've suggested a particular book (optional, but appreciated).

27 comments:

Kaye said...

The Cooking School Murders, by Virginia Rich. I thought this was an old one here, but I'm not finding it. Can't say where I ran into it. It's fun, and lots of food.

AM Nichols said...

Siren's Feast was really good. It's kind of like Eat, Pray, Love but with more food (and recipes!) and less navel gazing.

Ana said...

How about "Chocolat," by Joanne Harris. I haven't read it, but the book has gotten great reviews. About every day life in a French village, and pages filled with references to confections of every type. Shall we?

silviaozzie said...

I suggest Under the Tuscan Sun - the book is almost as appetising as the movie

Debra Eliotseats said...

Speaking of Tuscany, what about 1000 Days in Tuscany and 1000 Days in Venice or The Lady in the Pallazzo all by Marlena di Blasi????

Deb in Hawaii said...

Great suggestions everyone! We'll be sure and take a look before we pick the next set of books this year. Keep them coming! ;-)

Tiffany said...

Purple Chicken: The Adventures and Misadventures of a Wannabe Chef shares one man’s entertaining foray into the often unpredictable world of culinary arts as he learns to produce delectable creations and discovers the unexpected.

Approaching retirement means different things to different people, but to sixty-something Ron Gaj, who had always loved to cook, it meant trying something new—culinary school. As he details his often hilarious journey through the world of culinary arts with a cast of characters who seemed better groomed for reform school, Gaj provides a glimpse into how he sharpened his rudimentary cooking skills through weeks of chopping, dicing, boiling, sautéing, and participating in the solution of simple math problems that were treated like quantum physics—ultimately becoming a braver soul in the kitchen.

Anne said...

I'm recommending a book by an Australian author, Charlotte Wood. "Love and Hunger: Thoughts on the Gift of Food" expounds on the idea that sharing food is like sharing love. This is a warm, lively and entertaining illustration of the author's passion for wonderful food and the joy of sharing it with special people.

Rachel said...

All of these suggestions for upcoming Cook the Books selections sound very tasty! Keep them coming...

Wendy Klik said...

The books I am recommending don't necessarily contain recipes but they are certainly all about food in all it's different forms. I didn't know if having recipes included was a requirement. I have only participated twice so far and both books did have recipes. Anyway, if it doesn't need recipes I would like to recommend Hit by a Farm by Catherine Friend, Farm City by Novella Carpenter and Heat by Bill Buford. Animal, Vegetable, Mineral by Barbara Kingsolver is another great one but I think I saw it on your list already.

Simona Carini said...

Thank you Wendy, for your suggestions. Yes, we've read the Kingsolver's book and also Heat.

Betty said...

Nonfiction - Vie de France: Sharing Food, Friendship, and a kitchen in the Loire Valley by James Haller and Mediterranean Summer: A Season on France's Cote d'Azur and Italy's Costa Bella by David Shalleck -- Who can resist food and travel!

Some Fiction - Not too long ago, I read The Wedding Bees: A Novel of Honey, Love and Manners by Sarah-Kate Lynch and Delicious! by Ruth Reichl, both were excellent. Love anything by Barbara O'Neal. Market Street by Anita Hughes was really good. Loved Angelina's Bachelors: A Novel with Food, Friendship Bread by Darien Gee, and The Love Goddess Cooking School by Melissa Senate. I just love to read about food and you guys do a great job of finding interesting books!

Anonymous said...

Really enjoyed Last Chinese Chef | Nicole Mones. Modern and delicious.

Simona Carini said...

Thanks for the suggestion. Cook the Books read that novel a little while ago and enjoyed it too.

Amy CookingAdventures said...

How about Food: A Love Story by Jim Gaffigan? https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/20697471-food

Gaffigan is a comedian, so there are lots of laughs and a plethora of food inspiration!

Wendy Klik said...

Beth of the Printcess just reviewed a book that sounds like so much fun.....Cinnamon and Gunpowder by Eli Brown. A novel about a chef who is captured by pirates and has to keep them well fed in order to save his life. You can read Beth's review at http://artemishi.blogspot.com/2015/04/book-review-cinnamon-and-gunpowder.html

ihath said...

I suggest the novel Spoonful Chronicles. It tells the story of a woman on a mission to unlock her destiny by remembering everything she has ever eaten. The book comes with info on how to sign up to a mailing list where you can get all the recipes. So you can read the book and eat it too.

More info: http://ihath.com/spoonful-chronicles/

Claudia said...

Oh boy, some great suggestions here! I'm going to be checking them out.

Lynda H said...

I have a couple of suggestions!

First, The Cooking Gene: A Journey Through African American Culinary History in the Old South, by Michael Twitty. The Kindle version is currently on Amazon, with print versions coming in July 2018. Michael's a Jewish African American culinary historian that focuses on tracing the history and influence of slaves through food customs and has a blog (afroculinaria.com) that good look at his focus and writing style.

The second is 97 Orchard: An Edible History of Five Immigrant Families in One New York Tenement, by Jane Zeigelman. This book talks about five families that lived in one NYC tenement building in the early 20th century, and how they brought and adapted the foods of their original country of origin to what was available to them as immigrants.

I've not (yet) read either although I am aware of Twitty's style, but they both sound quite interesting and each offer a wide variety of food inspiration from around the world as interpreted in American cooking. :)

Lynda H said...

Correction to my previous comment - The Cooking Gene is currently available in both hardcover and Kindle. It's the paperback that comes out next summer.

Deb in Hawaii said...

Hi Lynda,
Sorry to just reply now--it looks like your comment was sitting in Comment Moderation. These are two great suggestions. The Cooking Gene is on my TBR list and 97 Orchard sounds like it will end up there too. Thank you for sharing! ;-)

cactuseaters said...

Hi, I'd like to suggest Sweet Spot: An Ice Cream Binge Across America. The author went to Penn State's ice cream short course(where Ben & Jerry learned to make dessert). There's an entire chapter on how to make the perfect batch of ice cream at home.

Lynda H said...

I just finished the Crazy Rich Asians trilogy - any of these three are chockful of food descriptions and plenty of fun insanity!

Debra Eliotseats said...

Thanks, Lynda. That is good info and I was wanting to dig into those! Great suggestion.

Claudia said...

Lynda, The Cooking Gene is up on our list of books this year, right after our current selection, Sourdough. And, too funny, I went to reserve Crazy Rich Asians at our State Library, and I'm number 299 on the list. So, it may be awhile before I get to read it. Probably the interest is high, this being Hawaii!

Elaine Webster said...

I'm not sure if it's possible to recommend our own creative non-fiction, but here it goes. In 2011 I self published "Heartfelt" Caregiver's Guide to Cardiomyopathy and Mitral Valve Surgery. http://elainewebster.com/heartfelt/
The memoir-style account covers 16 years of My husband Blake's and my dealings with his heart disease, surgery and final recovery. The last chapter includes recipes. I also have a blog, "Beyond Cuckoo" that is about anything.http://elainewebster.com/blog/

Simona Carini said...

Your book sounds like a great resource for people giving care and support for a loved one going through a complicated procedure, Elaine. Thank you for stopping by and for telling us about it.